Results from the Researcher Development Framework

138 resource(s) found!
  • Access is a relational database management system, and there is a wide range of learning material available to help you learn to use it. Our databases teacher suggests pathways to lead you through the resources you need.

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the modelling of 3D environments.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • Prepare an application that successfully marries the desired information within your CV, covering letter and your online presence, using Word 2010.

  • Dreamweaver is one of the most popular website authoring tools. This course book and related exercises introduce you to the Dreamweaver development environment and shows you how to create a simple web site.

  • Even small web sites can become difficult to maintain and keep up to date. This course book and related exercise files show how the tools in Dreamweaver can be used to help with the management of your page content, and the site as a whole.

  • This course book and related exercise files show you how to use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) within Dreamweaver to add styling and layout to your web pages.

  • This course book and related exercise files will use Adobe Dreamweaver to show you how to add simple interactivity on your web pages and include multimedia such as flash animation and audio. We will also take a brief look at what multimedia features HTML5 makes available to us.

  • This module is about poster design. It emphasises how the design process should be approached in PowerPoint, but there is much that is also applicable in other tools.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the basic skills that you already have in using PowerPoint to help you create effective presentations. The book is arranged as '10 principles' that address different aspects of presentation design, and can be used as a guide for creating new presentations, or enlivening existing ones.

  • This course follows on from Illustrator: An introduction and focuses on Illustrator's creative tools. You will work with advanced tools and techniques allowing you to create more sophisticated illustrations.

    You will become familiar with shadows, effects and blends. You will learn advanced tools such as the Pathfinder tool, envelopes and Artboards.

  • This course book and related exercise files introduce you to the basic features of InDesign, one of the leading Desk Top Publishing (DTP) applications.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the techniques covered by the InDesign: Introduction course to help you create professional documents, brochures and other printed publications.

  • Digital images are a valuable part of your research and presentations, sometimes critically so. This session introduces you to some of the key issues that you need to be aware of when sourcing, adapting and using them. Although the focus is the use of images in an academic context, the ideas covered are equally relevant to your personal image collections.

  • Audacity is a free, cross-platform, audio-editing application. It can be used to create digital audio material suitable for a course, a podcast or on a website.

    In this module you will learn how to use Audacity to record, manipulate and save a sound file.

  • Learn about producing documents in PDF (Portable Document Format), a universal file format that preserves all of the fonts and layout of the original document. We will first learn how PDF files are created and look at formatting and manipulation of PDFs. We will then discuss annotating PDFs and completing PDF forms.

  • This course provides you with the skills to create a professional-looking document using the free OpenOffice Writer word processing software. A series of time-saving techniques are covered, for creating a well-structured document that is easy to revise and manage.

  • The aim of this course is to help you make more informed decisions when setting up your camera to take photographs.

  • Watch this video for some suggestions on how to use an iPad for research and academic work.

  • Audacity is a cross-platform, free program for recording and editing sound. You can use it to record live audio or to edit existing recordings. The website has a comprehensive help guide and the software is easy to use yet powerful enough to edit and produce good quality results.

  • Scribus is a free, open source desktop publishing application that runs on Windows, Mac and Linux platforms. It is emminently suitable for creating posters, leaflets and brochures, and booklets up to about a hundred pages or so. This course book uses Scribus to introduce you to the main concepts of desktop publishing.

  • This 'free' downloadable book covers the essentials of Apple's presentation application, KeyNote. It is funded by occasional adverts within the text, but these are not intrusive.

  • This 'free' downloadable book covers the essentials of Apple's word processing application, Pages. It is funded by occasional adverts within the text, but these are not intrusive.

  • This 'free' downloadable book covers the essentials of Apple's spreadsheet application, Numbers. It is funded by occasional adverts within the text, but these are not intrusive.

     

  • This course book and related exercise files introduce you to the basic features of InDesign, one of the leading Desk Top Publishing (DTP) applications.

  • "Data Sharing and Management Snafu in Three Short Acts" is a short (and entertaining) animated video from NYU Health Science Libraries.

    It provides a vivid illustration of some key issues in research data management – and why these matter.

  • Do you need to write many similar letters or emails? Create name badges? Mail merge allows the easy creation of personalized form letters, emails, etc. This course covers the process from start to finish, including writing personalized form letters and creating personalized form emails. You will use mail merge to send name badges, envelopes, and labels, and to build directories and lists.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the techniques covered by the InDesign: Introduction course to help you create professional documents, brochures and other printed publications.

  • Photoshop is the industry standard software package for digital image manipulation. This session will cover working with digital photographs that have been transferred to your computer. You will be introduced to a model workflow for image manipulation and correction.

  • The WebLearn Surveys (beta) tool allows Oxford WebLearn users to design and deliver online surveys (free of charge). This short session allows you to get started quickly, if you don’t have time to attend the 3-hour WebLearn: Surveys course. The 3-hour course is recommended for further details and practice.

  • Mendeley describes itself as "a free reference manager and academic social network". You can use it to organise your papers (group, tag, filter), search them, add annotations (notes and highlights) and share these with others. You can access your library from multiple computers and mobile devices. You can also use Mendeley to find new material based on what you are reading.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Medical Science. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • This online skills course for members of Oxford University provides an introduction to the issues surrounding plagiarism.

    It will help you to acquire some of the necessary skills and judgement to apply to your academic work and publications.
    This is the certification course recommended by the Education Committee and the divisions.

  • EndNote for Windows comes with a set of Word document templates. Learn how to use these to create an empty document, formatted and laid out ready to write a paper for one of the well-known academic journals.

  • Interactive whiteboards (sometimes called 'Smart Boards' after Smart Technologies product) can be a valuable teaching tool, but they are often perceived as being yet another technology to get to grips with.

  • Inkscape is a free cross-platform program used for creating illustrations such as diagrams, technical drawings, maps and logos. It has similar features to Illustrator. It produces vector-based graphics which can be scaled without losing quality making them ideal for printed documents.

  • Audacity is a cross-platform, free program for recording and editing sound. You can use it to record live audio or to edit existing recordings. The website has a comprehensive help guide and the software is easy to use yet powerful enough to edit and produce good quality results.

  • Use EndNote to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. EndNote also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers.

  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free program that you can use for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring among other things.

    GIMP can be used on different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac) and for a wide variety of tasks. It can be extended with additional plug-ins.

  • Evaluating the impact of scientific output can be very useful in your career as a researcher, for instance when looking for top publications in a subject area, deciding where to publish, for grant applications, and new collaborations. Research metrics provide one possible way of evaluating research impact.

  • PowerPoint is the presentation software part of Microsoft Office suite. It allows you to create slides and combine these into a presentation. You can include different kind of material: text, images, diagrams, sound, video. PowerPoint will allow you to control the design of the slides and the transition between them in many different ways.

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  • WebLearn is Oxford University’s VLE (Virtual Learning Environment), sometimes called a learning platform. It is used for making teaching and learning materials available in one integrated location, as well as for interaction and communication between teaching, learning and research communities.

     

  • Microsoft Office Word is a word-processing program with many advanced functions that will save researchers time.

  • Software that manages references and creates bibliographies, like EndNote, can also be used more generally as an information management tool. You can create searchable indexes, synchronise across multiple devices, use tags and keywords and share your collections.

  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free program that you can use for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring among other things.

    GIMP has an active user community and support material; instructions and tutorials can be found in abundance online.

  • The Journal Citation Report ranks sets of journals in science and social science by measuring the frequency of citation of their articles.

    Journal Citation Reports can show you the:

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  • Once you have collected and analysed your data and read the relevant literature, it is time to synthesise your research. You have to combine your thoughts, results and conclusions with references and illustrations and write it up in a suitable format.

  • An important part of your research is disseminating your findings. You do this in your thesis and published papers, of course, but there are many other ways you can share your results.

    To think about: How do you share? What do you share? What can you release? Who do you share with? How do you protect your rights to your findings?

  • Many researchers work together in a research group or on a project. Even if you are not involved in collaborative work in that sense, you can gain some of the benefits of working with others, whether that is working on a joint project or simply sharing ideas and experiences with researchers working in similar areas.

  • Typically, your research data will be analysed and written up into one or more research outputs – books, theses, articles, conference papers, and so forth. However, the data itself may well also be a valuable resource, and consequently you may wish to consider sharing or archiving it.

    Read an article with further information.

  • There are many ways you can make information about yourself and your work available online.

  • Some research may require that you create audio or video at some stage in your research process. It may be part of your data gathering (recording bird song or a linguistic feature, capturing a patient's unnatural movement, recording an interview), your dissemination (showing your results as moving images, presenting your research as a podcast) or just something your choose to do.

  • The impact factor (IF) of an academic journal is a measure reflecting the average number of citations to recent articles published in the journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field.

    Measuring research impact is important because it helps you to:

  • 4shared is an online storage facility where registered users can store their text, audio, video, photo, and other files. Access to the files can be restricted to the owner, shared with a restricted set of other people (chosen by the file owner), or open to everyone. The type of access can also be set, allowing the owner to define who can do what to the files and folders in the account.

  • Animoto is a website that you can use to create promotional-style videos of images, video-clips, and music. Upload your images and video-clips (or point to them if you keep them online on a photo managing site like Flickr, Facebook, or Picasa), add text if you want any and then choose your music, either by selecting something from the Animoto collection or by uploading your own track.

  • A.nnotate is an online tool which allows you to upload and annotate documents (including PDFs), web snapshots, and images. You can organise material using folders and tags; text documents, tags, and your notes are indexed for easy searching. Uploaded material is stored in your own private space, with options to share individual documents or folders with other people.

  • Apache Subversion is an open source version control system. For those working on collaborative research projects which involve writing program code or developing software applications, it may be a valuable aid; it can also be used as a more general document management system.

  • A blog will allow you to publish what you want to say online in a quick and simple way, using text, sound, images, video.

    Blogs can have more than one owner/writer: for example a joint blog for a research team. You can opt to allow readers of your blog to comment on your posts.

  • Watch a video that helps you think about how you could use a blog in your work

  • Camtasia is one of the most popular screen capture software applications for Windows and the Mac and is produced by TechSmith.  Use it to record on-screen activity or import HD camera video, customize and edit content, and share your videos with others. It has similar functionality to Captivate, can record and export PowerPoint presentations as movies and has a good selection of output file for

  • Camtasia is one of the most popular screen capture software applications for Windows and the Mac and is produced by TechSmith.  Use it to record on-screen activity or import HD camera video, customize and edit content, and share your videos with others. It has similar functionality to Captivate, can record and export PowerPoint presentations as movies an

  • Adobe Captivate is a tool you can use for recording onscreen activity.  Captivate can be used for creating interactive simulations, software-skills training, quizzes and e-learning courses.  Captivate runs on Windows computers with a beta version currently being tested for the Mac.

  • Adobe Captivate is a tool you can use for recording onscreen activity.  Captivate can be used for creating interactive simulations, software-skills training, quizzes and e-learning courses.  Captivate runs on Windows computers with a beta version currently being tested for the Mac.

    Follow tutorials from the Adobe company, to learn about the interface and how to use Captivate

  • Diigo is an online bookmarking and annotation tool. When you add a Web page to your Diigo library, you can then highlight sections or add notes, much as you would on a printed document. Because your annotations are saved on the Diigo server, you can access them from any computer (or from a mobile device) by logging in to your Diigo account.

  • Diigo is an online bookmarking and annotation tool. When you add a Web page to your Diigo library, you can then highlight sections or add notes, much as you would on a printed document. Because your annotations are saved on the Diigo server, you can access them from any computer (or from a mobile device) or share them with colleagues.

  • A discussion board or forum is an online area where participants exchange their views and opinions on a given topic by posting messages.

  • Dropbox is a file synchronisation service.

  • The central Oxford University email is part of the Nexus365 service, which also gives you access to an online calendar. You can give other people access to your calendar, and schedule meetings, share contacts, tasks, files and folders with your colleagues.

  • RefWorks is a well-established reference management tool which allows you to manage your citations/references, insert them into your work as footnotes or in-text citations, automatically generate bibliographies and easily switch between citation styles.

    Members of Oxford University and alumni may have an account with RefWorks, free  of charge via the Bodleian Libraries subscription.

  • The Journal Citation Reports (JCR) are used to identify the most influential journals by subject. They are particularly useful for researchers looking to publish in high impact journals. JCR ranks journals in Science, Technology and Social Sciences using a range of impact factors based on citation data (i.e. the number of times a journal has been cited).

  • Scopus is a major database for literature searching in Science, Medicine and some Social Science subjects.

  • The Web of Science is a huge literature searching database, bringing together 5 major tools for searching high impact scholarly journals, books and conference proceedings:

  • Purpose

    Flickr is a way to share photographs. You can choose whether your pictures are visible to anyone or only to those you offer access and you can also decide to what extent others may use your photos.

  • Flickr is a way to share photographs: watch videos and learn how to use it efficiently

  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free program that you can use for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring among other things.

    GIMP can be used on different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac) and for a wide variety of tasks. It can be extended with additional plug-ins.

  • GarageBand is a program from Apple that allows you to create music or podcasts.

    You can use it to record and play back multiple tracks of audio, play virtual instruments, and edit MIDI files. You can also download music lessons to learn to play the piano or guitar.

  • GarageBand is a program from Apple that allows you to create music or podcasts.

    You can use it to record and play back multiple tracks of audio, play virtual instruments, and edit MIDI files. You can also download music lessons to learn to play the piano or guitar.

    Try these tutorials and videos, to help you get started with GarageBand.

  • iLife is a set of applications for working with multimedia (images, audio, video) on Mac/Apple computers (Mac OS X operating system). iLife is usually included on new Mac computers but can also be purchased separately.

    The set includes:

  • iTunesU is an area within Apple's online digital media store where educational institutions provide their own collection of audio and visual material (such as lectures, talks and interviews). The material can be downloaded free of charge.

  • Keynote is the presentation software part of the Apple iWork suite. It allows you to create slides and combine these into a presentation. You can include different kinds of material: text, images, diagrams, sound, video. Keynote will allow you to control the design of the slides and the transition between them in many different ways.

  • A mailing list is a convenient way to send messages to a group of people. There are lists for different purposes and groups. You may be added to some lists automatically - such as a list for your college or course - and there are others that you choose to join.

  • Mobile Oxford "mox" is a service run for students and staff at the University of Oxford as well as the general public. You can access it on your mobile device or as a website on your computer.

    The address is m.ox.ac.uk

  • myExperiment is a Virtual Research Environment.

    With this web-based tool scientists can publish and share their workflows and experiments plans. Users can search, sort, and swap workflows and other digital objects.

  • A short video that explains why you might want to learn about Google Tag Manager

  • This course covers special aspects of Word which will help you create and manage your thesis or similar large, formal documents.

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Planning, producing and shooting".

  • MHRA is a footnote citation style used in the Humanities. A corresponding output style is provided with EndNote, however some details of its behaviour may not be as required.

    A Modern Languages requirement is that if a reference is re-cited, and more than one references by the author are cited, a short form of the title must be appended to the citation

  • This module is about poster design. It emphasises how the design process should be approached in PowerPoint, but there is much that is also applicable in other tools.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the basic skills that you already have in using PowerPoint to help you create effective presentations. The book describes the presentation creation 'journey' from planning to delivery. It is accompanied by a presentation that can be used as an ideas source, and a collection of open-ended exercises for you to try.

  • Improvements in mobile technology are transforming the way we create video content. Everything from documentaries to feature films is now being shot on mobile phones. This one day course will guide you through the ins and outs of producing quality multimedia content with minimal equipment.

  • Creating an online presence can open up your research and teaching (or any interest!) to a global audience and is now essential in promoting yourself professionally to the outside world. This 3-hour workshop offers a comprehensive introduction to online presence and also gives a supported environment for you to plan, create, and add to your own projects.

  • Social media is an important technological trend that has big implications for how researchers (and people in general) communicate and collaborate. Researchers have a huge amount to gain from engaging with social media in various aspects of their work.

  • "Word de-mystified": This course provides you with key skills to master Word beyond the everyday level.

    This video activity will help you prepare for attending the workshop "Documents: Good practice in document design".

  • This course covers techniques for working with complex documents such as reports and theses, and for assembling multiple chapters into a book.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Documents: Building long documents".

  • WordPress is an online Open Source website creation tool, it is probably the easiest and most powerful blogging and website Content Management System (CMS) in existence today.

  • "Word de-mystified": This course provides you with key skills to master Word beyond the everyday level. A range of time-saving techniques are covered, for creating a well-structured document that is easy to revise and manage.

  • Learn techniques for working with complex documents such as reports and theses, and for assembling multiple chapters into a book.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the workflow for managing digital images.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the workflow for managing digital illustrations.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • Learn to use WordPress.com to create webpages and blogs that are efficient and reliable.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Create an online presence with WordPress".

    The short videos will take you through the process of setting up and emailing confirmation of your account with WordPress.com.

  • This course takes you through the workflow for creating professional publications using a desktop publishing (DTP) tool such as InDesign or Scribus. It assumes some basic familiarity with a DTP tool, and enables you to explore the techniques that will ensure you create publications which are adaptable and easy to maintain.

  • MyStudyBar is a free 'floating toolbar to support literacy' (Eduapps.org). This session will explore some of the text to speech, screen masking and mindmapping applications, that are part of MyStudyBar and which help to make electronic text or information more accessible to users. Other free software/apps that can be used to support study (including study strategies) will also be discussed.

  • Does your research paper or departmental web site need eye-catching 3D visuals? Do you have data that could be presented attractively in 3D? This course covers the basics of using free 3D modelling software tools to model, render and animate. In this workshop you will learn how to create and manipulate simple 3D environments, set up lights and cameras and apply materials.

  • This playlist is in support of a workshop covering the modelling of 3D objects.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. You do not need to work through the post-course playlist below ahead of the session, however you may like to take a glance at it and be aware of the topics that it covers.

  • This course works with Audacity and OpenShot to produce podcast resources to represent academic practice or outside interests

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Podcasting: An introduction".

  • A comprehensive 3-day introduction to all the core skills needed to make a short documentary. You will have the opportunity to work on a project that reflects your interests with full support in filming and editing.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Producing a mini documentary".

  • The course will get you comfortable using your mobile device to create short videos to suit a variety of needs.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Shooting movies on your mobile".

  • This course introduces the key concepts in developing an online presence strategy.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Online presence: Taking control".

  • Before coming along to the workshop, take the opportunity to look at some examples of posters in your own field. These may be 'hanging around' your department, or perhaps colleagues are willing to share posters they have created. You might like to identify aspects of the posters which work (and those that don't).

    You can see online examples of posters at the following web site:

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Editing and post-production". It will take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities.

  • This one-day, practical, hands-on course will introduce you to simple techniques to help you with conducting an interview and being interviewed, for audio and video.

  • Before coming along to the workshop, take the opportunity to think about presentations you have seen in your own field. You might like to identify aspects of the presentations which worked (and those that didn't). You could also recall the best and worst presentations you have seen on any topic.

    You can see online examples of presentations at the following web site:


     

  • In this course we will use various software packages, such as Illustrator and Inkscape, for creating vector-based illustrations such as diagrams, technical drawings, maps and logos. These vector-based graphics can be scaled without losing quality making them ideal for printed documents.

  • You'll learn everything from shot sequences and interviewing, to story boarding and structure. It will give you a solid knowledge of the basics of production and filming up to the point of editing.

  • In this boot-camp you will discover how Word’s powerful tools work together to save you time. If you want to spend less time fighting with the word-processor and more time thinking about your content, this practical workshop brings together topics covered in the separate Documents courses from this series.

  • The activities below will prepare you for the workshop 'Flipped learning and live audience preparation. We strongly recommend that you browse the following links BEFORE attending the workshop.

  • In this boot-camp you will discover how Word’s powerful tools work together to save you time. If you want to spend less time fighting with the word-processor and more time thinking about your content, it brings together topics covered in the separate documents courses from this series.

  • This 3 hour session will look at the benefits of using video to explain something and introduce you to a range of different tools to capture stills and video using your computer, tablet or smartphone. Learn about screencasting and its potential uses.
    We'll also learn tips and tricks to help you get started with video.

  • Microsoft Office Word is a word-processing program with many advanced functions that will save researchers time.

    In a long document, you will want to control the way the text flows from one page to the next: Word has formats which manage your page breaks.

  • Windows comes with a number of useful tools that will save you time.

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the huge library of online video-based courses at LinkedIn Learning can help you in your work.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • Download a filter to help you import BibTeX files into EndNote and a style for outputting EndNote references in BibTeX format (suitable for ORCID uploading).

  • Citation indexes allow you to find items which have cited a particular work or author by analysing the bibliographies of books and articles. This can help you to discover new items in the same research area or to track how thinking has developed on a particular topic.

  • This course works with Audacity and OpenShot to produce podcast resources to represent your academic practice, departmental work or outside interests.


     

  • Audacity is a free, cross-platform, audio-editing application. It can be used to create digital audio material suitable for a course, a podcast or on a website.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Audio: Recording the spoken word".

  • This recorded webinar provides a general introduction to web accessibility, including common issues encountered, the importance of considering accessibility and high level guidance on producing accessible sites including:

  • This iMovie course shows you the basic workflow involved in editing video on a computer to make a finished project. You will learn how to create a sequence from video footage that is trimmed and edited. Other features include adding text, transitions, music and effects where appropriate to facilitate the creation of a well-polished short film.

  • HTML, what's that? 

    This is a beginners class in creating effective but simple web pages using HTML.  You will learn how to structure simple web pages with clear navigation as well as learn to organise web content for both readability and accessiblity. 

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system

  • This recorded webinar provides an introduction to key aspects of web accessibility relevant to web designers.

  • Inkpath is a personal skills tracking app.

    Did you know that, as an Oxford researcher, you get a FREE licence to use Inkpath, and can take it with you when you leave? With Inkpath you can:

    •     Discover activities, resources and guidance from across Oxford, relevant to you

    •     Adopt goals and pathways curated by Oxford’s Divisions

  • A comprehensive 3-day introduction to all the core skills needed to make a short documentary. You will have the opportunity to work on a project that reflects your interests with full support in filming and editing.

  • A recorded webinar providing guidance for organisations on creating and maintaining an accessibility policy, including:

  • This is the first recorded webinar in a three part series aimed specifically at website developers. The first two webinars cover key aspects of web accessibility relevant to web developers and how to create sites that meet the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1), level AA. 

  • This is the second recorded webinar in a three part series aimed specifically at website developers. The first two webinars cover key aspects of web accessibility relevant to web developers and how to create sites that meet the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.1), level AA.  

  • At lunchtimes, we offer a wide-ranging series of interesting one-off talks, featuring colleagues from across the University.

    For upcoming titles and to book your place, visit our course booking system https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/LMSPortal/UI/Page/Courses/Search.aspx and search for "lunchtime".

  • Third webinar in a three part series aimed specifically at website developers. This webinar builds on the previous two webinars, looking in detail at accessibility considerations for JavaScript coding.

  • This recorded webinar provides an introduction to key aspects of web accessibility relevant to website content editors and authors.