Results from the Researcher Development Framework

292 resource(s) found!
  • In this video you will learn about data normalisation. Data normalisation is an interesting but complex subject that needs to be studied at some length.

    However, in this short video we will introduce the concept by looking at it in a more simple way, to see how data should be stored so it can be easily retrieved.

  • An integrated activity for practising a range of database skills on relational databases - try out the methods and techniques you have learnt from IT Learning Centre database courses. The tasks are designed to be tried using Access.

  • Access is a relational database management system, and there is a wide range of learning material available to help you learn to use it. Our databases teacher suggests pathways to lead you through the resources you need.

  • EndNote's Online Search tool uses a file known as a connection file to make contact with each bibliographical database, seeking references to scholarly texts. A wide range of standard connection files are provided when EndNote is installed.

  • Not all versions of EndNote work with all versions of operating systems. Read about requirements for Windows and/or MacOS with EndNote.

  • Stay up to date with the latest patches and updates, direct from the EndNote company.

  • An EndNote style file that you can download and use with documents for Oxford University.

    Note that practice varies between departments at Oxford University, as regards the way that written works should be cited. Some departments prefer a particular style, while others have no preference.

  • Some suggestions for working with images in a database, and how to display the images with each record.

  • Some tips from our teachers, for effective working with Word.

  • Some Microsoft movies and demos on aspects of creating and using databases

  • A trailer for the Oxford Open Spires project.

    The OpenSpires project builds upon the Oxford on iTunes U podcasting service launched in October 2008, which has widespread participation from Oxford academics. Oxford podcasts currently include recordings of public lectures, including those from eminent visiting speakers, interviews with researchers, and conference presentations.

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the modelling of 3D environments.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • Read this article for things you can check if you find that EndNote and Word won't play nicely together, and ways to fix this.

    For more on software compatibility, look at this article.

  • Prepare an application that successfully marries the desired information within your CV, covering letter and your online presence, using Word 2010.

  • This course book and related exercise files will use Adobe Dreamweaver to show you how to add simple interactivity on your web pages and include multimedia such as flash animation and audio. We will also take a brief look at what multimedia features HTML5 makes available to us.

  • How do you filter, summarise and subtotal large lists of data? With this course you will learn all about advanced filtering, database and other advanced functions to answer the question.

    Want to do some "what-if-analysis"? Want to find out how to create dynamic models that instantly recalculate when related cell values change? How do you analyse external data?

  • Want to do some frequency distribution? Then learn to use arrays and array formulae.

    Want to learn to create dynamic charts that update automatically as you add rows of data? Not easy, but you'll learn how on this course.

    Do those repeated tasks bore you? Automate the process with macros. Once you've mastered macros, learn to change the macro with code and VBA.

  • As a data analysis tool it is hard to see past pivot tables. The pivot table tool allows you to create a summary structure from a list of data by dragging and dropping fields graphically.  Learn how easy it is to create multiple views, calculated fields and items just by dragging and dropping. Want to create a pivot chart from an external data source or filter data with Slicers? Easy.

  • Analysing your data across multiple worksheets and workbooks? It couldn't be easier using 3-D referencing. Perhaps you want to collaborate with others? Find out how to protect your workbooks or even lock some areas, to keep the data secure and prevent accidental edits. Want to learn some advanced charting features and how to create histograms? Learn how to do all this and more.

  • This module is about poster design. It emphasises how the design process should be approached in PowerPoint, but there is much that is also applicable in other tools.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the basic skills that you already have in using PowerPoint to help you create effective presentations. The book is arranged as '10 principles' that address different aspects of presentation design, and can be used as a guide for creating new presentations, or enlivening existing ones.

  • ArcGIS Explorer is a free, basic and easy-to-use geographic information system (GIS). GIS is used for making maps and performing spatial queries and analysis. While the functionality of Explorer is very limited, and probably inadequate for many university-level users, it is taught here as an important stepping stone to the more complex and powerful ArcGIS Desktop.

  • This session covers intermediate-level skills in working in ArcGIS Explorer. Explorer is a basic and easy-to-use desktop geographic information system (GIS) that is free to download. It is part of the ArcGIS software range, which also includes web-based and mobile GIS, as well as the much more powerful ArcGIS Desktop.

  • This session covers the fundamentals of working in MapInfo. MapInfo is a geographical information system (GIS) that is very popular among entry-level users due to its low cost and ease of use. GIS is software that is designed to store, query, analyse, process and visualise spatial data.

  • MapInfo is a geographic information system (GIS) that is very popular among entry-level users due to its low cost and ease of use. GIS is software that is designed to store, query, analyse, process, and visualise spatial data.

  • This session covers techniques for working with raster imagery, such as printed or scanned maps or aerial photography. The relationship between image (i.e. pixel) coordinates and geographic coordinates will be explained, and students will be shown how to 'geo-reference' raster images. The session will also cover several approaches to extracting spatial data from raster images.

  • Digital images are a valuable part of your research and presentations, sometimes critically so. This session introduces you to some of the key issues that you need to be aware of when sourcing, adapting and using them. Although the focus is the use of images in an academic context, the ideas covered are equally relevant to your personal image collections.

  • Photoshop is the industry standard software package for image manipulation, creating digital artwork, and optimising images for the web. In this session you will be introduced to its fundamental tools and features, including working with layers and selections.

  • Photoshop is the industry standard software package for digital image manipulation. This session will cover working with digital photographs that have been transferred to your computer. You will be introduced to a model workflow for image manipulation and correction.

  • This is the course book that accompanies the Programming Concepts course. The course is for those with no programming experience who either want/need to take one of our programming courses, or who are just curious about some of the concepts involved in programming.
     

  • C++ is one of the most popular and powerful programming languages.

  • Keeping research material well organised can often be time consuming and tedious. Whether you work chiefly with texts, images, or structured data, this course will introduce some software and online tools to make the process easier and more efficient.

  • This course covers many of the most commonly used and most useful commands for more complex (and more realistic) data manipulation and analysis.

  • This module covers a number of key areas in Stata. You will learn about the analysis of survey data and how to make graphs. How to perform common statistical analyses is also covered, although the emphasis is on the Stata commands and interpretation of output rather than on teaching statistics.

  • An introduction to using some of the more advanced data manipulation commands in Stata including commands which are commonly used within programs. The course also covers the basic commands required to write your own programs in Stata.

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Planning, producing and shooting".

  • The WebLearn Surveys (beta) tool allows Oxford WebLearn users to design and deliver online surveys (free of charge). Create your own template (master list of questions), set survey specifications (such as opening dates, notifications, reminders etc.), and assign the survey to a group of respondents (or allow it to be public).

  • If you are new to web browsing, this self-study unit will help you to use popular aspects of the internet.

  • Watch this video for an introduction to digital photography.

  • This course introduces some aspects of discovery, creation, and use of digital images.

  • The aim of this course is to help you make more informed decisions when setting up your camera to take photographs.

  • Watch this video for some suggestions on how to use an iPad for research and academic work.

  • View the online manual and tutorials: a direct link to the EndNote website

  • To help students get started with NVivo, QSR International (the developers of the tool) provide a free online eDemo outlining how NVivo can be used to enhance your research project/activities.

  • View the website for R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics.

  • Word is a powerful word-processor with many features that will save you time and frustration.
    Our academic word-processing teacher suggests pathways to lead you through the resources you need.

  • Using Word, Excel and Outlook together, to send personalised emails to a list of recipients.

    The mailmerge function in Microsoft Office is a powerful tool for combining data from a list in Excel with standard text in Word to create a set of letters or other documents, each with personalised details.

  • Use Word efficiently by creating templates, so each template acts as a pattern for a family of matching new documents. When Word is working with Windows7 or Mac Mountain Lion, you may not easily find the Templates folder where your custom templates and the important Normal template are stored.

  • Scribus is a free, open source desktop publishing application that runs on Windows, Mac and Linux platforms. It is emminently suitable for creating posters, leaflets and brochures, and booklets up to about a hundred pages or so. This course book uses Scribus to introduce you to the main concepts of desktop publishing.

  • Oxford University's Faculty of History have traditionally required students to use a specific Faculty referencing style. However, students who are using a reference management app (such as EndNote or Zotero or RefWorks) are now free to use one of these approved standard international styles:

  • If the data in your database is sensitive, you need to control who may have access to it. If the database is to be used unsupervised, you may wish to control which parts of the database the user can have access to.

  • Designing web pages that display effectively on all types of devices (phones, tablets, desktops) is a challenge.

    The use of media queries is one approach and this is covered in the Dreamweaver: Using CSS for Styling and Layout course.

    Another approach is to design your pages using a grid layout. The Adobe TV website has a video (17m) that describes this technique.

  • Breaking news: (March 2019)  EndNote software will soon be available free of charge for University members to install on their personally-owned computers. Please bear this in mind if you are thinking of paying for a copy of EndNote.

  • 1. Use Mozilla Firefox

  • This course is part of a series intended to introduce basic concepts, skills, and tools for working with data in R so that you can get more done in less time, and with less pain. This course is aimed at novice programmers to teach you how to get started using R, introduce some programming concepts, R syntax, and the RStudio environment.

  • This course book and related exercise files introduce you to the basic features of NVivo 9, one of the leading qualitative data analysis applications.

    You will develop the essential skills necessary to manage and analyse small qualitative datasets through the NVivo software platform.

  • This course book and related exercise files introduce you to the basic features of NVivo 10, one of the leading qualitative data analysis applications.

    You will develop the essential skills necessary to manage and analyse small qualitative datasets through the NVivo software platform.

    Some of the topics covered:

  • EndNote has a Find Full Text tool which can seek online the full text of a paper or journal article, typically as a PDF file. Once found, the PDF is copied into your reference library and attached to the relevant reference.

  • The Hierarchical File Server (HFS) is a university-wide backup service, open to all postgraduates and all staff. This course will give you an introduction to backing up your data to the HFS, using Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) software. You will learn about the different types of backup account for which you can register; how to install TSM; and how to back up and restore your data.

  • Javascript is one of the most widely used programming languages; alongside HTML and CSS it provides the three key technologies that create content for the Web. JavaScript can be used to make webpages interactive and to write online programs accessible through a web site. The majority of web sites use JavaScript and it is supported by all modern web browsers on all platforms.

  • SketchUp is a simple yet powerful 3D modelling program.

    This advanced session covers materials, i.e. the textures that are applied to the surfaces of a 3D model. Materials are a key way of adding detail and realism to a model, and keeping a model 'light' by avoiding adding unnecessary geometry.

  • The WebLearn Surveys (beta) tool allows Oxford WebLearn users to design and deliver online surveys (free of charge). This short session allows you to get started quickly, if you don’t have time to attend the 3-hour WebLearn: Surveys course. The 3-hour course is recommended for further details and practice.

  • Perl is a stable, cross platform programming language that is used in many computer systems around the world for web programming, database manipulation, text processing, and system administration. This course will cover the basics of the language.

  • In this course you will first learn some simple command line programming with basic flow control in Java. We then move on to Object Oriented Programming with classes and objects and see how these programming concepts relate directly to real life objects, their attributes and behaviours.

  • This four-session course covers the map-making aspects of ArcGIS Desktop and introduces its analytical functionality. Powerful and relatively complex, Desktop is the industry standard for geographic information systems (GIS) software.

  • SPSS is a statistics and data analysis program.  The course will finish with an informal assessment to help you consolidate your understanding of SPSS and your ability to choose appropriate tests for several research questions.

  • The main legal citation style in the UK is the Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (OSCOLA). A corresponding output style can be downloaded and included in EndNote's repertoire of styles.

  • Abstract:     

  • Bamboo DiRT is a tool, service, and collection registry of digital research tools for scholarly use.

    Developed by Project Bamboo, Bamboo DiRT makes it easy for digital humanists and others conducting digital research to find and compare resources ranging from content management systems to music OCR, statistical analysis packages to mindmapping software.

     

  • There’s no single right or wrong way to organise your research material – it’s a question of finding what works for you. Read about a variety of approaches and think about how you will apply them in your research.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Medical Science. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • In citing an article, you may be required to give the name of the journal in full, or using a standard abbreviation.

    EndNote can handle this automatically, using a Term List with journal names and their standard abbreviations. Read this article to find out how to set an output style to do this, and how to update your term list of journal names.

  • This article explains how to create a Word document where users can only type/edit in areas that you have chosen.

    An alternative to building a form, this simple method gives a document where users can format their own text as they prefer.

  • Read about keeping your EndNote software updated

  • EndNote for Windows comes with a set of Word document templates. Learn how to use these to create an empty document, formatted and laid out ready to write a paper for one of the well-known academic journals.

  • EndNote is widely used with Microsoft Word, but it can be used with a range of other word-processors with Windows or Mac OS or LaTeX.

     

    Read about setting up and working with LibreOffice Writer

  • Each reference in your EndNote library is assigned a reference type. While many are journal articles, books, etc, there are plenty of more specialist types for you to use. Choosing a suitable reference type will mean that relevant field names are shown, and the citation will be formatted appropriately.

  • EndNote maintains lists of the keywords, authors' names and journal names previously used. It offers these as autocomplete suggestions when you add new data.

    Read this article to find out how to manage term lists, adding and correcting entries, creating a new list and suppressing unwanted items.

  • View video tutorials online for some useful tips and tricks for using EndNote to manage your research reading and to format your citations and bibliographies.

    Visit the EndNote website and look at the list of online tutorials: www.endnote.com/training

  • Free online tutorials to help university students develop their Internet research skills.

    Learn how to make discerning use of the Internet to help find information for your coursework and assignments.

  • A brief introduction to Programming Style - some things to consider when choosing layout, naming variables, and adding comments to your programs. Written by Thaddeus Aid.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Humanities. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Social Science. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Maths, Physical and Life Sciences. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • You will learn to organise your data with a good relational database design, from concept to implementation. During the taught course, we will discuss the fundamental concepts that you need to apply when designing a database. In groups, course participants work on a number of activities to help them practice the concepts and to lead them towards designing their own database.

  • GIMP is a free cross-platform image manipulation program. It has a similar feature set to Adobe Photoshop. This course is an introduction to the tool.

  • Suggestions for output styles that are said to be widely used in various academic fields. If you are experimenting with the appearance of a document, you might like to try some of these. if you are submitting work for publication, you should check your publisher's advice for authors.

  • These course notes and exercises build on your basic knowledge of GIMP from the Digital Images: GIMP Introduction course. GIMP is a free cross-platform image manipulation program. It has a similar feature set to Adobe Photoshop.

  • A free basic account is available for anyone to set up, to use a limited version of EndNote online. But if you later install the full desktop version of the EndNote software, you can upgrade your online account for better features, more storage etc.

    This article describes the steps to do this.

  • Mathworks, the creators of MATLAB , have created a series of videos, webinars and code examples to help you get the most out of the application. We still think that a taught course is the best way to be introduced to the software, but if you can't wait, or can't get on a course, take a look at the Mathworks resources.

  • Keeping track of your references and formatting them correctly for your thesis or publication can be a chore.

  • An exploration of techniques that can be used  to help identify and avoid errors in Excel worksheets.

    The course includes advice on the design of new Excel solutions.The course includes a three stage approach where issues about organising data, managing it over time and designing new solutions is discussed in a workshop style.

  • Why Learn Python?

    In my experience Python is one of the easier languages to learn and due to its syntax it helps to provide a solid foundation in good coding practice.

  • This activity should be read before you start learning a programming language

  • SketchUp is a simple yet powerful 3D modelling program. This session covers how to perfect your modelling with advanced techniques.

    Learning the correct techniques for modelling is the foundation for making sure that your models can be reused in different situations and environments.

  • Structured Query Language (SQL) is a programming language designed for managing data held in a relational database management system (RDBMS).

  • This one-day workshop for Historians and Archaeologists presents some of the key skills in using a computer to support Historical Research.

  • If part of your EndNote library gets lost or corrupted, there is a chance you can recover the library.
    Download an explanation and the steps to take ...

    ... and then resolve to keep frequent backup copies from now on!

  • Locate articles, book reviews and conference proceedings, using bibliographical databases.

  • Use EndNote to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. EndNote also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers.

  • Excel is a well-known spreadsheet application. Use it to collate and organise data, to carry out calculations and analysis, and to create graphs.

    Excel is made available as part of the Microsoft Office suite and also sold separately.

     

  • Evaluating the impact of scientific output can be very useful in your career as a researcher, for instance when looking for top publications in a subject area, deciding where to publish, for grant applications, and new collaborations. Research metrics provide one possible way of evaluating research impact.

  • How do you keep up with current research when so much is being published? Alerting services allow you to receive notifications of new publications by email or by RSS feed. Using alerting services, you can get new research to come to you rather than you having to go out and find it.

  • Picasa is a photo management program owned by Google. You can download it for free and use it to organise and edit photos on your computer. It doesn't move or copy your pictures but just helps you organise and view them conveniently. You can use the Picasa Web Albums application to share your pictures online.

     

  • PowerPoint is the presentation software part of Microsoft Office suite. It allows you to create slides and combine these into a presentation. You can include different kind of material: text, images, diagrams, sound, video. PowerPoint will allow you to control the design of the slides and the transition between them in many different ways.

  • Use RefWorks to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. RefWorks also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers. A bibliography is assembled automatically at the end of the document.

    Members of Oxford University may have an account with RefWorks, free of charge.

     

  • SPSS is a program used by many non-statisticians for simple to moderately advanced data analysis. It is among the most widely used programs for statistical analysis in the social sciences. SPSS was formerly known as PASW.

  • The ProQuest platform provides access to many databases, including the largest online database of theses and dissertations.

  • SOLO (Search Oxford Libraries Online) is the principal search and discovery tool for Oxford Libraries. It searches our electronic collections as well as the printed collections of the Bodleian Libraries and many College and other libraries associated with the University of Oxford, OxLIP+, the ORA and the Bodleian's Allegro catalogues.

     

  • Bibliographical databases allow you to search for papers on your research topic across a range of journals and other resources. These tasks will guide you through databases and citation indexes specific to your subject area. Choose the task that best suits you.

  • The Web of Science is an online abstracting and indexing database which concentrates on the prestigious high-impact journals. Its strength lies in citation searching – the “association of ideas” built up through bibliographies.

  • Microsoft Office Word is a word-processing program with many advanced functions that will save researchers time.

  • WorldCat is the world’s largest network of library content and services, containing references for approximately 1.5 billion items from thousands of libraries worldwide. You can use it to find references to material that is not available at Oxford, and to find more information on a research topic.

     

  • Explore the functionality of the full text digital library of Ancient Greek documents, TLG or Thesaurus Linguae Graecae.

     

    For this task, you will need web browser software such as Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer installed on your computer. Talk to your IT support person about this.

  • Bibliographic software allows you to create and organise a personal database of bibliographic records for the books, journals, and other works relevant to your research. This can be used to add citations and formatted bibliographies (in a wide variety of styles) to your own writing.

  • An increasing number of research projects are now making use of some form of structured data – that is, data which consists of sets of comparable information, in which multiple items or objects share certain common features.

  • It’s worth giving some thought to your file naming conventions: helpful filenames can save a lot of time when you’re looking for a document, especially if it’s one you haven’t used in a while.

    This article discusses the value of organising your files and documents with consistent filenames. It gives tips and tricks which will help with your academic research.

  • A relational database is a means of storing, manipulating, and analysing structured data. Databases store data in tables, which are a series of records. Each row of a database table contains one record, with information stored in multiple fields (the columns of the table).

  • Efficient note taking is an important part of the academic research process.

  • Many Windows users take advantage of shortcuts on their computer desktop or Start menu to access programs they use frequently. Shortcuts can also be used within your file structure, as an aid to organising your material. If you organise your files into folders and subfolders, you may come across documents which seem to belong in more than one category.

  • A free hands-on workshop for research students. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of research resources in one time-efficient session.

  • The Research Skills Toolkit explores IT and library tools, tips and techniques to support researchers.

    It also holds the resources used at the Research Skills Toolkit workshops, for later reference.

  • Explore the functionality of the full text digital library of Ancient Greek documents, using TLG or Thesaurus Linguae Graecae.

  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free program that you can use for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring among other things.

    GIMP has an active user community and support material; instructions and tutorials can be found in abundance online.

  • Picasa is a photo management program owned by Google. You can download it for free and use it to organise and edit photos on your computer. It doesn't move or copy your pictures but just helps you organise and view them conveniently. You can use the Picasa Web Albums application to share your pictures online.

  • Picasa is a photo management program owned by Google. You can download it for free and use it to organise and edit photos on your computer. It doesn't move or copy your pictures but just helps you organise and view them conveniently. You can use the Picasa Web Albums application to share your pictures online.

  • SPSS is a program used by many non-statisticians for simple to moderately advanced data analysis. It is among the most widely used programs for statistical analysis in the social sciences. SPSS was formerly known as PASW.

  • The Journal Citation Report ranks sets of journals in science and social science by measuring the frequency of citation of their articles.

    Journal Citation Reports can show you the:

  • WorldCat is the world’s largest network of library content and services, containing references for approximately 2 billion items.

    It can be used to check references and gather information about collections in thousands of libraries worldwide. You can use it to find references to material that is not available at Oxford, and to find more information on a research topic.

  • DYABOLA is a database interface program providing access to (among other databases) the Archäologische Bibliographie, a near-comprehensive bibliographical store of the monograph and periodical literature of classical archaeology from 1956 to the present day, based on the subject catalogue (Realkatalog) of the unrivalled library collections of the Deutsches Archaologisches Institut in Rome.

  • What RefWorks is and why it might be useful. Watch a series of video tutorials about how to collect references and create a bibliography using the RefWorks software.

    Watch online or download print versions.

  • Locating books and journals for your research can be trickier than you might think.

    Library catalogues are the first place to start with this task and are fairly intuitive to use. However, learning to use library catalogues effectively will improve your search results and will save you time, so look out for taught courses and self-study tutorials.

    Tools you should look at:

  • A literature review is both a process and a text.  It is a process of searching, reading, thinking and writing about the academic literature, which will inform and enable you to craft a well-written text (a text that establishes the intellectual geography of your research topic and locates, elucidates and justifies your research question).  A literature review is also a circular exercise – your

  • The impact factor (IF) of an academic journal is a measure reflecting the average number of citations to recent articles published in the journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field.

    Measuring research impact is important because it helps you to:

  • Keeping up to date with new publications and papers in your research area is a vital but time consuming task, particularly as you approach your submission date. Setting up database alerts, RSS feeds and saved searches so that new papers and other materials come to you, makes it much easier.

  • All research projects will make use of information of some description – whether this is gathered from existing sources or created as part of the project itself. This section provides information about some common ways of acquiring research data, and some things to keep in mind as you do this.

  • As a research student it will be important to you to find published and unpublished materials such as articles, papers, books, theses and primary research materials to support your research.

  • 4shared is an online storage facility where registered users can store their text, audio, video, photo, and other files. Access to the files can be restricted to the owner, shared with a restricted set of other people (chosen by the file owner), or open to everyone. The type of access can also be set, allowing the owner to define who can do what to the files and folders in the account.

  • Reference Management

    Use EndNote Online to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. EndNote Online also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers.

  • The Intelex PAST MASTERS series aims to be the world's largest collection of full text electronic editions in the humanities, especially, English Literature, Medieval Studies, German Literature, Philosophy, Theology, and Womens’ Studies .

  • Bibliographical databases are the best tools for identifying content in a subject area or by an individual. In this task you explore a modular, subject-based bibliographical database, Oxford Bibliographies On-Line.

  • RefWorks is a well-established reference management tool which allows you to manage your citations/references, insert them into your work as footnotes or in-text citations, automatically generate bibliographies and easily switch between citation styles.

    Members of Oxford University and alumni may have an account with RefWorks, free  of charge via the Bodleian Libraries subscription.

  • JournalTOCS is a freely available service providing recent tables of contents of over 24,000 academic journals.

    You can set up email alerts or subscribe to RSS feeds on JournalTOCS so that new tables of contents of your favourite journals are sent to you automatically.

  • Keeping up to date with new publications and papers in your research area is a vital but time-consuming task, particularly as you approach your submission date. Subscribing to RSS feeds so that new papers and other materials come to you automatically makes it much easier.

  • Being the successor to the Royal Historical Society Bibliography online, BBHI is a comprehensive guide to historical writing about the history of Britain, Ireland, and relations with the empire and Commonwealth from 55BC to the present.

  • COPAC is a union catalogue bringing together the collections of 80 UK Research Libraries.

  • Published since 1954, Historical Abstracts has long been recognized as the leading bibliography for historical study in the world.

    Currently over 2,000 journals published throughout the world are covered in the database, making this a historical periodical database unmatched in breadth.

  • The Journal Citation Reports (JCR) are used to identify the most influential journals by subject. They are particularly useful for researchers looking to publish in high impact journals. JCR ranks journals in Science, Technology and Social Sciences using a range of impact factors based on citation data (i.e. the number of times a journal has been cited).

  • OxLIP+ is Oxford’s dedicated gateway to online resources.

    It covers a wide range of materials including:

  • Scopus is a major database for literature searching in Science, Medicine and some Social Science subjects.

  • SOLO (Search Oxford Libraries Online) is the primary tool for searching Oxford’s physical and electronic library collections. It covers:

  • The Web of Science is a huge literature searching database, bringing together 5 major tools for searching high impact scholarly journals, books and conference proceedings:

  • Excel is a well-known spreadsheet application. Use it to collate and organise data, to carry out calculations and analysis, and to create graphs.

  • FileMaker Pro is a relational database management system.

  • FileMaker Pro is a relational database management system.

    A relational database allows you to store complex data in tables, and to define the relationships that exist between different parts of the information.

    Learn how to get started, using these short videos.

  • Purpose

    Flickr is a way to share photographs. You can choose whether your pictures are visible to anyone or only to those you offer access and you can also decide to what extent others may use your photos.

  • Flickr is a way to share photographs: watch videos and learn how to use it efficiently

  • Free Studio is a bundle of free software which will allow you to convert video and audio files between different formats and upload and download them to your computer or mobile device. You can also use Free Studio to perform basic editing of video and audio files.

  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free program that you can use for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring among other things.

    GIMP can be used on different platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac) and for a wide variety of tasks. It can be extended with additional plug-ins.

  • GarageBand is a program from Apple that allows you to create music or podcasts.

    You can use it to record and play back multiple tracks of audio, play virtual instruments, and edit MIDI files. You can also download music lessons to learn to play the piano or guitar.

  • GarageBand is a program from Apple that allows you to create music or podcasts.

    You can use it to record and play back multiple tracks of audio, play virtual instruments, and edit MIDI files. You can also download music lessons to learn to play the piano or guitar.

    Try these tutorials and videos, to help you get started with GarageBand.

  • Google is probably the most well-known search engine used today. What many do not realise is that it offers more functions than most people use in their normal web searching.

    Do you know how to search for synonyms, how to restrict a search to academic websites, or find web pages that have similar content to a given site?

  • Google is probably the most well-known search engine used today.

    Do you know how to search for synonyms, how to restrict a search to academic websites, or find web pages that have similar content to a given site?

    By learning more about the advanced search options and special features, you will be able to refine your searches to help you find the resources you need.

  • This introductory course covers some basic statistical concepts and is intended for staff who need to use statisitical information in their work but may also be useful for research staff who want to refresh their knowledge of simple statistics. It enables learners to apply these concepts in a spreadsheet environment using Excel. Topics covered by the course include:

  • With Google Earth installed, you can view satellite images, maps and more not only from all over the world but also under the oceans and in outer space. You can search for and mark places for later reference and also get directions to or from a place.

    Google Earth is a downloadable application from Google.

  • Google Scholar is a search engine for scholarly material such as peer-reviewed papers, theses, pre-prints, abstracts, and technical reports. Google Scholar indexes material that is freely available and also restricted material where the publisher have given their permission. That means that you can find pointers to relevant material even if the article or book is not freely available.

  • This is an advanced course in working with large data sets and producing pivot tables to summarise information. It provides a detailed look at the uses for pivot tables and producing graphs from them.

     

    Topics include:

    Creating and formatting pivot tables

    Expanding and collapsing pivot table data

    Filter sort and group pivot table data

  • iLife is a set of applications for working with multimedia (images, audio, video) on Mac/Apple computers (Mac OS X operating system). iLife is usually included on new Mac computers but can also be purchased separately.

    The set includes:

  • LaTeX is a typesetting system, most often used for technical or scientific documents.

  • This is an advanced course in using Excel's analytical tools. The course includes a wide range of features, from using Excel Add-Ins for functionality not available in the standard installation to using 'what-if' tools to model potential outcomes of a project.

     

    Topics covered include

    VLookup

    Add-Ins such as the Analysis Toolpak

  • Oxford researchers use a variety of image databases, many of which are listed under the Images tab of Oxford’s research guide to Art & Architecture: http://libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk.  The University subscribes to two image databases comprising upwards of 1 million high-resolution images: Artstor & Bridgeman Education.

  • Bibliographical databases are one of the best tools for locating journal articles, book reviews, collections of essays and conference proceedings even if you don’t know the authors or article.
    In this task you can explore two of the most important history ones: Historical Abstracts and/or Bibliography of British and Irish History.

  • The Bodleian Libraries provide help and guidance with the use of ArcGIS

    Some resources are also available here in the Portfolio (search for ArcGIS for example)

  • This course covers special aspects of Word which will help you create and manage your thesis or similar large, formal documents.

  • This module is about poster design. It emphasises how the design process should be approached in PowerPoint, but there is much that is also applicable in other tools.

  • This course book and related exercise files builds on the basic skills that you already have in using PowerPoint to help you create effective presentations. The book describes the presentation creation 'journey' from planning to delivery. It is accompanied by a presentation that can be used as an ideas source, and a collection of open-ended exercises for you to try.

  • Improvements in mobile technology are transforming the way we create video content. Everything from documentaries to feature films is now being shot on mobile phones. This one day course will guide you through the ins and outs of producing quality multimedia content with minimal equipment.

  • Creating an online presence can open up your research and teaching (or any interest!) to a global audience and is now essential in promoting yourself professionally to the outside world. This 3-hour workshop offers a comprehensive introduction to online presence and also gives a supported environment for you to plan, create, and add to your own projects.

  • One of the most useful things to be able to do with a word processor is to do mail merge.

  • This is an advanced course in working with large data sets and producing pivot tables to summarise information. It provides a detailed look at the uses for pivot tables and producing graphs from them.

     

    Topics include:

    Creating and formatting pivot tables

    Expanding and collapsing pivot table data

    Filter sort and group pivot table data

  • This task will give you a flavour of how such databases might be used in your research. You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

    You will need a web browser installed on your computer. Talk to your IT support person about this.
     

  • This is an advanced course in using Excel's analytical tools. The course includes a wide range of features, from using Excel Add-Ins for functionality not available in the standard installation to using 'what-if' tools to model potential outcomes of a project.

     

    Topics covered include

    VLookup

    Add-Ins such as the Analysis Toolpak

  • If you are new to Microsoft Office, here is an opportunity to get your skills started in Word, Excel, and Office.

    With each set of videos, you can follow the simple step-by-step instructions, working at your own pace. Watch the demos, then start up your computer and have a go for yourself!

    Each set of videos should take under 15 minutes to watch.

  • The aim of the course is to develop core statistical skills for interpreting clinical and epidemiological data. It will provide knowledge of statistical methods and study design used in medical research. The course will enable participants to develop the skills needed to analyse data for their own research projects.

  • EndNote is widely used with Microsoft Word, but it can be used with a range of other word-processors.

    Read the steps for setting up and working with LibreOffice Writer.

     

     

     

  • EndNote is widely used with Microsoft Word, but it can be used with a range of other word-processors.

    Pages is a word-processor for Mac, which can work with EndNote using a plugin that is provided by Apple. Read the steps for setting up and working with Pages and EndNote together.

     

     

     

  • "Word de-mystified": This course provides you with key skills to master Word beyond the everyday level.

    This video activity will help you prepare for attending the workshop "Documents: Good practice in document design".

  • This course covers techniques for working with complex documents such as reports and theses, and for assembling multiple chapters into a book.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Documents: Building long documents".

  • You will learn to organise your data with a good relational database design, from concept to implementation.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Concepts of database design".

  • If you need to build, plan or revise a database, this is the course. You will create tables with fields and a range of useful properties, learn about relationships between tables, create and manage them.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Building a database".

  •  

    Videos to help you create useful and workable reports in a database.

  • This course covers a variety of techniques for manipulating and analysing your data in a relational database.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Queries and data analysis".

  • Agent-based modelling (ABM) plays an important role in ecology, climate change, collective animal behaviour, economics, sociology, and many other sciences.

  • Download a tool to help you choose which software to use, for your database project.

    There is a variety of software available, for building databases. The best choice for your work will depend on a number of factors.

  •  

    Learn to create spreadsheets that are efficient, easy to understand and reliable.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Learn to create spreadsheets that are efficient, easy to understand and reliable.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice in spreadsheet design".

  •  

    If you need to build, plan or revise a database, this is the course. You will create tables with fields and a range of useful properties, learn about relationships between tables, create and manage them.

  • For people who have to take over an existing database, and plan how they will adapt it for future use.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Inheriting a database".

  • This boot camp prepares you for designing, creating and using a relational database. If you need to get up to speed working with databases, it brings together topics covered in the separate database courses from this series.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Data management: Databases - start to finish".

  • Working with different types of large data sets producing pivot tables to summarise data.

    Using the features provided by pivot tables in Excel to enable you to create Filtered Reports, Slicers, use Calculated Fields as well as Grouping and Sorting data.

  • Learn the basics of PHP in the context of research at the University.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "PHP: Kick-off" and take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities.

  • WordPress is an online Open Source website creation tool, it is probably the easiest and most powerful blogging and website Content Management System (CMS) in existence today.

  • This course shows you a variety of ways to make your database safe, easy and efficient for people to work in, both when entering data and when analysing results.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: User-friendly database design".

  •  

    Finding your way around a relational database that other people have built, and adapting it for a new project, can be complex. This course takes you through the process of exploring and understanding a working database.

  • Learn to build queries to investigate and interpret your data, and try out a variety of techniques for manipulating and analysing your data in a relational database.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

  • This boot camp prepares you for designing, creating and using a relational database. If you need to get up to speed working with databases, it brings together topics covered in the separate database courses from this series.

  • Try out a variety of ways to make your database easy and efficient for people to work in, both when entering data and when analysing results

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • "Word de-mystified": This course provides you with key skills to master Word beyond the everyday level. A range of time-saving techniques are covered, for creating a well-structured document that is easy to revise and manage.

  • Learn techniques for working with complex documents such as reports and theses, and for assembling multiple chapters into a book.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • If you are managing a database project, you need an understanding of how relational databases work. This course helps you think through a good design for your project, which you (or others) can build later using the database software of your choice. You will consider ways to organise and analyse your data.

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the workflow for managing digital images.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • These playlists are in support of a workshop covering the workflow for managing digital illustrations.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. If you will be attending the workshop we STRONGLY RECOMMEND that you set aside some time to view the pre-course playlists for the relevant software.

  • Learn to use WordPress.com to create webpages and blogs that are efficient and reliable.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Create an online presence with WordPress".

    The short videos will take you through the process of setting up and emailing confirmation of your account with WordPress.com.

  • This course takes you through the workflow for creating professional publications using a desktop publishing (DTP) tool such as InDesign or Scribus. It assumes some basic familiarity with a DTP tool, and enables you to explore the techniques that will ensure you create publications which are adaptable and easy to maintain.

  • This short course covers the core skills required for a budding R user to develop a strong foundation for data analysis in the RStudio environment. Within the framework of a reproducible research workflow, we will cover importing and cleaning data, efficient coding practices, writing your own functions and using the powerful dplyr data manipulation tools.

  • A brief introduction to key assistive technology and apps that might help you to work and study more efficiently. Tools for planning and organisation, reading and writing will be included. We will show you free or low-cost tools available for both PCs and Macs and provide information on where and how to source the tools yourself.

  • This playlist is in support of a workshop covering the modelling of 3D objects.

    We find that people who spend a little time preparing for the workshop get the most benefit from it. You do not need to work through the post-course playlist below ahead of the session, however you may like to take a glance at it and be aware of the topics that it covers.

  • This two day course introduces you to the important elements of the language, taking you to a point where you will have the skills needed to write your own simple but useful programs, and make modifications to existing programs.

  • This course works with Audacity and OpenShot to produce podcast resources to represent academic practice or outside interests

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Podcasting: An introduction".

  • The course will get you comfortable using your mobile device to create short videos to suit a variety of needs.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Shooting movies on your mobile".

  • The course helps you organise a formal document, such as a University thesis, with numbering, table of contents and index, and properly numbered figures.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for attending this workshop.

  • This course introduces the key concepts in developing an online presence strategy.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Online presence: Taking control".

  • Before coming along to the workshop, take the opportunity to look at some examples of posters in your own field. These may be 'hanging around' your department, or perhaps colleagues are willing to share posters they have created. You might like to identify aspects of the posters which work (and those that don't).

    You can see online examples of posters at the following web site:

  • This course provides you with an introduction to Matlab.

  • Explore some of the functions which are provided with Excel, to help you apply statistics concepts to your data.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Typical statistics functions".

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Effective data management".

    These videos will take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities. A variety of video topics are included, so you can choose those which interest you. You can do them in more than one sitting if you prefer.

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Video: Editing and post-production". It will take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities.

  • Before coming along to the workshop, take the opportunity to think about presentations you have seen in your own field. You might like to identify aspects of the presentations which worked (and those that didn't). You could also recall the best and worst presentations you have seen on any topic.

    You can see online examples of presentations at the following web site:


     

  • This course is an introduction to Stata.

    Stata is a powerful quantitative software package that provides everything you need for data management and manipulation as well as descriptive, statistical, graphical and survey analysis of quantitative data. 

  • In this course we will use various software packages, such as Illustrator and Inkscape, for creating vector-based illustrations such as diagrams, technical drawings, maps and logos. These vector-based graphics can be scaled without losing quality making them ideal for printed documents.

  • This session provides an introduction to statistical functionality in Excel where you will learn how to use various tools to perform a core set of statistical operations including mean, standard deviation, frequency, goodness of fit, t tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression and then display the results in charts such as histograms. 

  • These playlists (one for each part of the workshop) will prepare you for learning the basics of using the NVivo qualitative analysis application.

  • This session provides an introduction to effective tools and techniques for planning, creating and maintaining spreadsheets. It shows you how to find and solve existing errors as well as introducing procedures that prevent new errors arising. The session also explains how to evaluate and “tame” a spreadsheet that you inherit so that you can deploy it effectively.

  • The course has an applied focus and makes minimum use of mathematics, with no derivations of formulae. You will learn what the word regression means in statistics and how it is applied to real examples using the statistical software R. You will be introduced to diagnostic tools for assessing assumptions and detecting influential observations and possible outliers.

  • Learn the basics of PHP in the context of research at the University.

    This workshop will introduce you to a real PHP program and, under guidance from your teacher, you will explore how a typical PHP program works without getting into the detail of the language syntax.

    Once you have seen how a program works, you will be encouraged to start an online course through Molly.

  • You'll learn everything from shot sequences and interviewing, to story boarding and structure. It will give you a solid knowledge of the basics of production and filming up to the point of editing.

  • The pre-course playlist will prepare you for the workshop "Programming: Starting to think like a programmer"

    You are strongly advised to watch the playlist ahead of the course. After the course you may like to visit the Post-course playlist.

     

  • This hands on session is designed to show you the potential of using apps to enhance learning and teaching. Bring along your mobile device and learn how to use different apps to support communication, collaboration, preparation, delivery and assessment for learning.


    Things you will need to do in advance:

  • In this boot-camp you will discover how Word’s powerful tools work together to save you time. If you want to spend less time fighting with the word-processor and more time thinking about your content, this practical workshop brings together topics covered in the separate Documents courses from this series.

  • This playlist will help you prepare for the "Usability testing: Do it yourself" workshop. We strongly advise you watch the videos in advance of the workshop so that you gain the maximum benefit from the activities. You can watch the videos in more than one sitting if you prefer.

  • If you need to get your research reading properly organised, collecting papers and references and citing them in your own work, then a reference management app is what you need.  If you want to spend less time micro-managing your research reading and citations, and more time thinking about your content, this workshop brings together topics covered in the separate EndNote courses from t

  • A first look at EndNote - an app for storing and managing references and creating bibliographies.

  • If you need to get your research reading properly organised, collecting papers and references and citing them in your own work, then a reference management app is what you need.

  • A strength of the EndNote app is the ability to devise your own output styles: learn to to control the behaviour of citations, footnotes and bibliographies in your academic documents.

  • A first look at EndNote - an app for storing and managing references and creating bibliographies.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Referencing: EndNote - Quick start".

  • If you need to get your research reading properly organised, collecting papers and references and citing them in your own work, then a reference management app is what you need.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Referencing: EndNote - Managing your research reading".

  • The activities below will prepare you for the workshop 'Flipped learning and live audience preparation. We strongly recommend that you browse the following links BEFORE attending the workshop.

  • A strength of the EndNote app is the ability to devise your own output styles: learn to control the behaviour of citations, footnotes and bibliographies in your academic documents.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Referencing: EndNote - Designing citations and bibliographies".

  • You can add a field to your table, in an Access database, which notes the date when the record was last edited.

  • In this course, you will work with different types of large data sets to produce pivot tables to summarise data.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice with pivot tables".

  • Learn the value of lookups and master some Lookup functions to use on your spreadsheets.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice with lookups".

  • This session provides guidance on which charts to use in both administrative and research situations and how to use them to convey messages clearly and effectively.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice with charts".

  • In this boot-camp you will discover how Word’s powerful tools work together to save you time. If you want to spend less time fighting with the word-processor and more time thinking about your content, it brings together topics covered in the separate documents courses from this series.

  • Some styles, such as APA 6th (sections), require a partial bibliography at the end of each chapter. Some work requires separate, categorised bibliographies such as for primary and secondary sources.

    Read this article to find out how to do this using EndNote.

  • EndNote offers a number of useful features and options for those who place their citations in footnotes.

    Read this article to find out how to do this using EndNote.

  • You can control the punctuation that appears in your citations, footnotes and bibliographies, as part of the templates.

    Read this article to find out how to do this using EndNote.

  • You can control the way that page numbers appear in your citations and footnotes.

    Read this article to find out how to do this using EndNote.

  • You can control many aspects of the way that your citations, footnotes, and bibliographies appear. Read about how to edit a variety of features of output styles, using EndNote, including these:

  • EndNote offers a number of features for managing the appearance and behaviour of a bibliography. Some are set in the output style, and some are set in the individiual document.

    Read this article to find out how to do this using EndNote.

  • In this boot-camp you will discover how EndNote’s powerful tools work together to save you time. If you want to spend less time micro-managing your research reading and citations, and more time thinking about your content, it brings together topics covered in the separate EndNote courses from this series.

  • This 3 hour session will look at the benefits of using video to explain something and introduce you to a range of different tools to capture stills and video using your computer, tablet or smartphone. Learn about screencasting and its potential uses.
    We'll also learn tips and tricks to help you get started with video.

  • Learn to work effectively with a typical database, using a clinical trials database as an example (Oxford Vaccine Group, OVG).

    Learn to build queries to investigate and interpret your data, and try out a variety of techniques for manipulating and analysing your data in an Access database.

  • ATLAS.ti is a workbench for the qualitative analysis of large bodies of textual, graphical, audio and video data. It offers a variety of features and advanced analysis tools for analysing, coding, and visualising a wide range of qualitative data (e.g., text, image, video, audio, geo-data, and Twitter data).

     

  • ATLAS.ti is a workbench for the qualitative analysis of large bodies of textual, graphical, audio and video data. It offers a variety of features and advanced analysis tools for analysing, coding, and visualising a wide range of qualitative data (e.g., text, image, video, audio, geo-data, and Twitter data).

  • This session shows you how to use Excel’s lookup functions to retrieve only the results that you need from spreadsheet tables of any size.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • XML is a popular markup language with vocabularies for encoding a wide variety of digital text and other data. It is widely used in, for example, the markup of digitised manuscripts and other documents to enable you to carry out detailed research usual in accordance with the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) guidelines.

  • Grow your confidence in devising and checking formulae in a spreadsheet.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Turning problems into simple formulae".

  •  

    A hands-on activity session to grow your confidence in devising and checking formulae in a spreadsheet.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Read about different ways to manage a many-to-many relationship in your data

  • Microsoft Office Word is a word-processing program with many advanced functions that will save researchers time.

    In a long document, you will want to control the way the text flows from one page to the next: Word has formats which manage your page breaks.

  • Windows comes with a number of useful tools that will save you time.

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the huge library of online video-based courses at LinkedIn Learning can help you in your work.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • If you are managing a database project, you need an understanding of how relational databases work. This course helps you think through a good design for your project, which you (or others) can build later using the database software of your choice.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Concepts for project managers".

  • Before coming along to a Kick-off session or one of our other classroom-based programming courses, you need to have some very basic understanding of the ideas behind programming. These are covered in the IT Learning Centre's Programming: Concepts workshops. The quiz below tests your knowledge of these ideas.

  • Download a filter to help you import BibTeX files into EndNote and a style for outputting EndNote references in BibTeX format (suitable for ORCID uploading).

  • Citation indexes allow you to find items which have cited a particular work or author by analysing the bibliographies of books and articles. This can help you to discover new items in the same research area or to track how thinking has developed on a particular topic.

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Start to finish".

  • These playlists (one for each part of the workshop) will prepare you for learning the basics of using the NVivo qualitative analysis application.

  • The Hierarchical File Server (HFS) is a university-wide backup service, open to all postgraduates and all staff. This course will give you an introduction to backing up your data to the HFS, using our IBM Spectrum Protect software (formerly known as TSM or Tivoli). This course is only available to members of the University of Oxford.

  • R: is one of the most widely used data analysis tools and has powerful data visualisation capabilities. This session covers the use of TidyVerse - a collection of R: packages, including ggplot2 the main R: data visualisation package.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "R: Visualisation".

  • Nexus365 offers a variety of tools and apps to help you work efficiently - here is a taste of how you could use them. These tasks provide a hands-on encounter with apps like OneDrive, Teams and video/audio conversations. You can explore ways of communicating and collaborating with colleagues, and start thinking about how you would use these tools in your own work.

  • On some machines with Mojave, attempting to use the EndNote CWYW tools to insert a citation may result in returning to the EndNote library, or an error message.

    Read a helpful note from Clarivate (the people who make EndNote) about how to set the Security options on your Mac.

  • This course works with Audacity and OpenShot to produce podcast resources to represent your academic practice, departmental work or outside interests.


     

  • Audacity is a free, cross-platform, audio-editing application. It can be used to create digital audio material suitable for a course, a podcast or on a website.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Audio: Recording the spoken word".

  • This course gives a brief background to Linux - where it came from, how it is made and who uses it.  You will explore the command line, and learn how to build your own commands.  You will be introduced to shell scripting as a way to automate tasks.  Finally you will take a look at the standard Linux office applications, and be shown how to find and install other useful programs.

  • If you want/need to bring along your own laptop to the R course, this document gives you some guidance on how you can install the R: environment in advance of the session.

  • This iMovie course shows you the basic workflow involved in editing video on a computer to make a finished project. You will learn how to create a sequence from video footage that is trimmed and edited. Other features include adding text, transitions, music and effects where appropriate to facilitate the creation of a well-polished short film.

  • HTML, what's that? 

    This is a beginners class in creating effective but simple web pages using HTML.  You will learn how to structure simple web pages with clear navigation as well as learn to organise web content for both readability and accessiblity. 

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system

  • Maple is maths software that you can use to solve equations, visualise maths solutions and more.

    Watch these videos to get yourself started using Maple.

    Explore the student resources for learning Maple

  • At lunchtimes, we offer a wide-ranging series of interesting one-off talks, featuring colleagues from across the University.

    For upcoming titles and to book your place, visit our course booking system https://cosy.ox.ac.uk/accessplan/LMSPortal/UI/Page/Courses/Search.aspx and search for "lunchtime".

  • This course is part of a series intended to introduce tools for working with data in R so that you can get more done in less time, and with less pain. In 'R: Data handling', we aim to teach you how to get started with importing data, handling data and simple explorations of datasets.

  • An introduction will be given of how to tidy up your data, and how to deal with common data manipulation challenges, before creating your own data visualisations using ggplot2. Graphics generated will include Scatterplots, Bar charts, Histograms, and Boxplots.