Results from the Researcher Development Framework

19 resource(s) found!
  • Access is a relational database management system, and there is a wide range of learning material available to help you learn to use it. Our databases teacher suggests pathways to lead you through the resources you need.

  • Research Data MANTRA is an acclaimed, independent, online learning course which provides guidelines for good practice in research data management

    In addition to a brief introduction and links to further resources, the course consists of eight main modules:

  • There’s no single right or wrong way to organise your research material – it’s a question of finding what works for you. Read about a variety of approaches and think about how you will apply them in your research.

  • Efficient note taking is an important part of the academic research process.

  • Before you can start on your research or any part of it, you need to define what it is you will be researching and how you intend to do that. It is important to analyse your research question so you can design a plan for how you are going to approach the research.

  • If you regularly work on multiple computers – a laptop and a desktop, for example, or one machine in your college or department and another at home – a file synchronisation (or ‘syncing’) service will help ensure you always have access to the latest version of all your material, without the hassle of emailing files to yourself or saving them to a flash drive.

  • Versioning (also called version control) is the process of keeping track of the different versions of a document as it passes through the process of being revised. It serves two key purposes:

  • Bubbl.us is a free web application which you can use to create mind maps online. The interface lets you create 'bubbles', link them to each other, and move them around. You can share your mind maps with others and allow them to contribute. The maps can be embedded in your blog or website, emailed or printed.

  • Bubbl.us is a free web application which you can use to create mind maps or brain-storms online. The interface lets you create 'bubbles', link them to each other, and move them around. You can share your mind maps with others and allow them to contribute. The maps can be embedded in your blog or website, emailed or printed.

  • Bubbl.us is a free web application which you can use to create mind maps or brain-storms online. The interface lets you create 'bubbles', link them to each other, and move them around. You can share your mind maps with others and allow them to contribute. The maps can be embedded in your blog or website, emailed or printed.

    This video will show how you might use Bubbl.us.

  • IHMC CmapTools is a (free) software toolkit for the creation and manipulation of concept maps. Once you have downloaded and installed the software, you can use it to create concept maps. You can upload your map to a shared space and allow others to contribute to it.

  • IHMC CmapTools is a (free) software toolkit for the creation and manipulation of concept maps. Once you have downloaded and installed the software, you can use it to create concept maps. You can upload your map to a shared space and allow others to contribute to it.

    Watch videos introducing the software and explaining how to use it (English or Espanol)

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the Research Skills Toolkit website might help with your research, and a quick look at one of the career development courses online, about avoiding plagiarism.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • FreeMind is free mindmapping software. It allows you to create a graphical representation of relationships between ideas or concepts. The map you create is searchable and you can export it in various formats.

    Boxes can contain text, images and links to local folders, online resources and executables. You can use different colours and fonts and connect the boxes in various ways.

  • Creating an online presence can open up your research and teaching (or any interest!) to a global audience and is now essential in promoting yourself professionally to the outside world. This 3-hour workshop offers a comprehensive introduction to online presence and also gives a supported environment for you to plan, create, and add to your own projects.

  • A brief introduction to key assistive technology and apps that might help you to work and study more efficiently. Tools for planning and organisation, reading and writing will be included. We will show you free or low-cost tools available for both PCs and Macs and provide information on where and how to source the tools yourself.

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the huge library of online video-based courses at LinkedIn Learning can help you in your work.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • Nexus365 offers a variety of tools and apps to help you work efficiently - here is a taste of how you could use them. These tasks provide a hands-on encounter with apps like OneDrive, Teams and video/audio conversations. You can explore ways of communicating and collaborating with colleagues, and start thinking about how you would use these tools in your own work.

  • Inkpath is a personal skills tracking app.

    Did you know that, as an Oxford researcher, you get a FREE licence to use Inkpath, and can take it with you when you leave? With Inkpath you can:

    •     Discover activities, resources and guidance from across Oxford, relevant to you

    •     Adopt goals and pathways curated by Oxford’s Divisions