Results from the Researcher Development Framework

100 resource(s) found!
  • An integrated activity for practising a range of database skills on relational databases - try out the methods and techniques you have learnt from IT Learning Centre database courses. The tasks are designed to be tried using Access.

  • Keeping track of all the information used in the course of a research project can be time consuming, difficult, or just plain dull. This course aims to help you identify the way of organising material that works best for you, and to outline some strategies for doing this as painlessly as possible.

  • Keeping research material well organised can often be time consuming and tedious. Whether you work chiefly with texts, images, or structured data, this course will introduce some software and online tools to make the process easier and more efficient.

  • This course covers special aspects of Word which will help you create and manage your thesis or similar large, formal documents.

  • Watch this video for some suggestions on how to use an iPad for research and academic work.

  • Download quick-start guides for RefWorks, directly from the RefWorks website.

  • View the website for R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics.

  • Breaking news: (March 2019)  EndNote software will soon be available free of charge for University members to install on their personally-owned computers. Please bear this in mind if you are thinking of paying for a copy of EndNote.

  • If you are embarking on a major research project which will result in a substantial quantity of data, you may need to produce a formal data management plan. This would typically detail the sort of data you expect to be working with, how you intend to generate and store data, the possibilities for data sharing and reuse, and strategies for long-term preservation beyond the project.

  • Research Data MANTRA is an acclaimed, independent, online learning course which provides guidelines for good practice in research data management

    In addition to a brief introduction and links to further resources, the course consists of eight main modules:

  • Have you ever wondered how to cite a television advert? Or what about an extract from a DVD? Do you ever need to provide advice to students or contributors about how to reference audiovisual content within their own work?

  • Microsoft Office Access is a relational database management system. You can use it for data which is too complex to be modelled using Excel spreadsheets. With Access you can store data in tables and then define and explore the relationship between the data in different ways. You can assemble your data into a set of related tables, then run your own queries and analyse your data.

  • Mendeley describes itself as "a free reference manager and academic social network". You can use it to organise your papers (group, tag, filter), search them, add annotations (notes and highlights) and share these with others. You can access your library from multiple computers and mobile devices. You can also use Mendeley to find new material based on what you are reading.

  • A free hands-on workshop for graduate researchers in Medical Science. An opportunity for you to learn about a broad range of resources in one time-efficient session.

  • Locate articles, book reviews and conference proceedings, using bibliographical databases.

  • Use EndNote to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. EndNote also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers.

  • Evaluating the impact of scientific output can be very useful in your career as a researcher, for instance when looking for top publications in a subject area, deciding where to publish, for grant applications, and new collaborations. Research metrics provide one possible way of evaluating research impact.

  • How do you keep up with current research when so much is being published? Alerting services allow you to receive notifications of new publications by email or by RSS feed. Using alerting services, you can get new research to come to you rather than you having to go out and find it.

  • Use RefWorks to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. RefWorks also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers. A bibliography is assembled automatically at the end of the document.

    Members of Oxford University may have an account with RefWorks, free of charge.

     

  • Bibliographical databases allow you to search for papers on your research topic across a range of journals and other resources. These tasks will guide you through databases and citation indexes specific to your subject area. Choose the task that best suits you.

  • Software that manages references and creates bibliographies, like EndNote, can also be used more generally as an information management tool. You can create searchable indexes, synchronise across multiple devices, use tags and keywords and share your collections.

  • There’s no single right or wrong way to organise your research material: the key question is what works best – for you, and for the type (or types) of information you’re dealing with. This document provides an overview of some things to consider when deciding how to organise your material, and of some common types of organisational system, with some of the pros and cons of each.

  • An increasing number of research projects are now making use of some form of structured data – that is, data which consists of sets of comparable information, in which multiple items or objects share certain common features.

  • The Journal Citation Report ranks sets of journals in science and social science by measuring the frequency of citation of their articles.

    Journal Citation Reports can show you the:

  • Mendeley says: "If you deal with academic knowledge, then Mendeley will make your life easier. It's a combination of desktop software and website which helps you manage, share and discover both content and contacts in research. It's easy to use, and it's free."

    Watch a video tutorial about how Mendeley can help your research.

  • What RefWorks is and why it might be useful. Watch a series of video tutorials about how to collect references and create a bibliography using the RefWorks software.

    Watch online or download print versions.

  • Before you can start on your research or any part of it, you need to define what it is you will be researching and how you intend to do that. It is important to analyse your research question so you can design a plan for how you are going to approach the research.

  • Once you have gathered your data or your information, you have to analyse it. You have to decide what kind of analysis you are going to perform (often more than one kind) and select the most useful tools and methods for this.

  • Once you have collected and analysed your data and read the relevant literature, it is time to synthesise your research. You have to combine your thoughts, results and conclusions with references and illustrations and write it up in a suitable format.

  • If you regularly work on multiple computers – a laptop and a desktop, for example, or one machine in your college or department and another at home – a file synchronisation (or ‘syncing’) service will help ensure you always have access to the latest version of all your material, without the hassle of emailing files to yourself or saving them to a flash drive.

  • Versioning (also called version control) is the process of keeping track of the different versions of a document as it passes through the process of being revised. It serves two key purposes:

  • Academic research often results in the creation of sensitive data. At the very least you may wish to control who has access to your research data, prior to peer review or publication, for example, and be able to determine, and keep track of, what others are authorised to do with your data.

  • If you’re working with structured data – the sort of thing that might be found in a table or database – it’s particularly important to ensure that your data is stored in the way that’s most conducive to the analysis you want to carry out.

  • Research integrity is a broad subject which encompasses a range of areas, some of which are relevant to most subjects (such as how to avoid plagiarism) while others may only relate to a particular area (such as how to obtain ethics clearance for research projects involving human participants and/or personal data or animal subjects).

  • All research projects will make use of information of some description – whether this is gathered from existing sources or created as part of the project itself. This section provides information about some common ways of acquiring research data, and some things to keep in mind as you do this.

  • As a research student it will be important to you to find published and unpublished materials such as articles, papers, books, theses and primary research materials to support your research.

  • 4shared is an online storage facility where registered users can store their text, audio, video, photo, and other files. Access to the files can be restricted to the owner, shared with a restricted set of other people (chosen by the file owner), or open to everyone. The type of access can also be set, allowing the owner to define who can do what to the files and folders in the account.

  • The AllMyNotes Organizer is a personal information management application for Windows. It provides a note-taking tool. Then you can arrange your notes (plus quotations, links, contact information, and more or less anything else you might want to record in a text file) in a customisable, easily searchable hierarchical folder structure.

  • Animoto is a website that you can use to create promotional-style videos of images, video-clips, and music. Upload your images and video-clips (or point to them if you keep them online on a photo managing site like Flickr, Facebook, or Picasa), add text if you want any and then choose your music, either by selecting something from the Animoto collection or by uploading your own track.

  • A.nnotate is an online tool which allows you to upload and annotate documents (including PDFs), web snapshots, and images. You can organise material using folders and tags; text documents, tags, and your notes are indexed for easy searching. Uploaded material is stored in your own private space, with options to share individual documents or folders with other people.

  • Irrespective of the kind of data you collect, you have to make sure it is kept safe; that it cannot be accidentally deleted or corrupted by you or anyone else. There are different ways you can do this, and the way you choose to do it depends on what you are working on and the kind of resources you have.

  • citeulike is a free service for storing, organising and sharing the papers you are reading.

  • Diigo is an online bookmarking and annotation tool. When you add a Web page to your Diigo library, you can then highlight sections or add notes, much as you would on a printed document. Because your annotations are saved on the Diigo server, you can access them from any computer (or from a mobile device) by logging in to your Diigo account.

  • Diigo is an online bookmarking and annotation tool. When you add a Web page to your Diigo library, you can then highlight sections or add notes, much as you would on a printed document. Because your annotations are saved on the Diigo server, you can access them from any computer (or from a mobile device) or share them with colleagues.

  • Dropbox is a file synchronisation service.

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the Research Skills Toolkit website might help with your research, and a quick look at one of the career development courses online, about avoiding plagiarism.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • Reference Management

    Use EndNote Online to build a library of the papers, books and other text you encounter in your research. EndNote Online also helps you insert citations to those works into your own word-processed documents and papers.

  • Excel is a well-known spreadsheet application. Use it to collate and organise data, to carry out calculations and analysis, and to create graphs.

  • FreeMind is free mindmapping software. It allows you to create a graphical representation of relationships between ideas or concepts. The map you create is searchable and you can export it in various formats.

    Boxes can contain text, images and links to local folders, online resources and executables. You can use different colours and fonts and connect the boxes in various ways.

  • Google is probably the most well-known search engine used today. What many do not realise is that it offers more functions than most people use in their normal web searching.

    Do you know how to search for synonyms, how to restrict a search to academic websites, or find web pages that have similar content to a given site?

  • Google is probably the most well-known search engine used today.

    Do you know how to search for synonyms, how to restrict a search to academic websites, or find web pages that have similar content to a given site?

    By learning more about the advanced search options and special features, you will be able to refine your searches to help you find the resources you need.

  • With Google Earth installed, you can view satellite images, maps and more not only from all over the world but also under the oceans and in outer space. You can search for and mark places for later reference and also get directions to or from a place.

    Google Earth is a downloadable application from Google.

  • Google Scholar is a search engine for scholarly material such as peer-reviewed papers, theses, pre-prints, abstracts, and technical reports. Google Scholar indexes material that is freely available and also restricted material where the publisher have given their permission. That means that you can find pointers to relevant material even if the article or book is not freely available.

  • It is vital that you keep your data safe and protect it from being corrupted or accidentally deleted. One way to do that is to use the Oxford HFS service. HFS is a centrally-funded service providing backup and long-term archive services to members of the University (senior members, post-graduates and staff only).

  • LifeGuide is a community that is developing and making available software that researchers and therapists can use to create, use, and evaluate internet-based behavioural interventions.

  • Oxford researchers use a variety of image databases, many of which are listed under the Images tab of Oxford’s research guide to Art & Architecture: http://libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk.  The University subscribes to two image databases comprising upwards of 1 million high-resolution images: Artstor & Bridgeman Education.

  • Bibliographical databases are one of the best tools for locating journal articles, book reviews, collections of essays and conference proceedings even if you don’t know the authors or article.
    In this task you can explore two of the most important history ones: Historical Abstracts and/or Bibliography of British and Irish History.

  • A mailing list is a convenient way to send messages to a group of people. There are lists for different purposes and groups. You may be added to some lists automatically - such as a list for your college or course - and there are others that you choose to join.

  • myExperiment is a Virtual Research Environment.

    With this web-based tool scientists can publish and share their workflows and experiments plans. Users can search, sort, and swap workflows and other digital objects.

  • MHRA is a footnote citation style used in the Humanities. A corresponding output style is provided with EndNote, however some details of its behaviour may not be as required.

    A Modern Languages requirement is that if a reference is re-cited, and more than one references by the author are cited, a short form of the title must be appended to the citation

  • Many researchers keep a copy of their EndNote library online, using EndNote Online.

    If the local EndNote desktop library is in a good condition, but the EndNote Online library has recently become damaged, you need a way to transfer the surviving good local content to the online copy. This article describes the steps needed.

     

  • This task will give you a flavour of how such databases might be used in your research. You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

    You will need a web browser installed on your computer. Talk to your IT support person about this.
     

  • Social media is an important technological trend that has big implications for how researchers (and people in general) communicate and collaborate. Researchers have a huge amount to gain from engaging with social media in various aspects of their work.

  • If you are new to Microsoft Office, here is an opportunity to get your skills started in Word, Excel, and Office.

    With each set of videos, you can follow the simple step-by-step instructions, working at your own pace. Watch the demos, then start up your computer and have a go for yourself!

    Each set of videos should take under 15 minutes to watch.

  • You will learn to organise your data with a good relational database design, from concept to implementation.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Concepts of database design".

  • If you need to build, plan or revise a database, this is the course. You will create tables with fields and a range of useful properties, learn about relationships between tables, create and manage them.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Building a database".

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    Videos to help you create useful and workable reports in a database.

  • Download a tool to help you choose which software to use, for your database project.

    There is a variety of software available, for building databases. The best choice for your work will depend on a number of factors.

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    Learn to create spreadsheets that are efficient, easy to understand and reliable.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Learn to create spreadsheets that are efficient, easy to understand and reliable.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice in spreadsheet design".

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    If you need to build, plan or revise a database, this is the course. You will create tables with fields and a range of useful properties, learn about relationships between tables, create and manage them.

  • For people who have to take over an existing database, and plan how they will adapt it for future use.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: Inheriting a database".

  • This boot camp prepares you for designing, creating and using a relational database. If you need to get up to speed working with databases, it brings together topics covered in the separate database courses from this series.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Data management: Databases - start to finish".

  • Learn the basics of PHP in the context of research at the University.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "PHP: Kick-off" and take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities.

  • This course shows you a variety of ways to make your database safe, easy and efficient for people to work in, both when entering data and when analysing results.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Databases: User-friendly database design".

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    Finding your way around a relational database that other people have built, and adapting it for a new project, can be complex. This course takes you through the process of exploring and understanding a working database.

  • This boot camp prepares you for designing, creating and using a relational database. If you need to get up to speed working with databases, it brings together topics covered in the separate database courses from this series.

  • Try out a variety of ways to make your database easy and efficient for people to work in, both when entering data and when analysing results

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Learn to use WordPress.com to create webpages and blogs that are efficient and reliable.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Create an online presence with WordPress".

    The short videos will take you through the process of setting up and emailing confirmation of your account with WordPress.com.

  • Data management plans (DMPs) are becoming an increasingly important aspect of research - many funding bodies now require one as part of a grant application. This course provides an overview of the basics of data management planning, plus a chance to try some online tools for building your own DMP.

  • A brief introduction to key assistive technology and apps that might help you to work and study more efficiently. Tools for planning and organisation, reading and writing will be included. We will show you free or low-cost tools available for both PCs and Macs and provide information on where and how to source the tools yourself.

  • The course helps you organise a formal document, such as a University thesis, with numbering, table of contents and index, and properly numbered figures.

     

    This video activity will help you prepare for attending this workshop.

  • Explore some of the functions which are provided with Excel, to help you apply statistics concepts to your data.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Typical statistics functions".

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Effective data management".

    These videos will take you through the topics you will need when you take part in the workshop activities. A variety of video topics are included, so you can choose those which interest you. You can do them in more than one sitting if you prefer.

  • This course is an introduction to Stata.

    Stata is a powerful quantitative software package that provides everything you need for data management and manipulation as well as descriptive, statistical, graphical and survey analysis of quantitative data. 

  • This session provides an introduction to statistical functionality in Excel where you will learn how to use various tools to perform a core set of statistical operations including mean, standard deviation, frequency, goodness of fit, t tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression and then display the results in charts such as histograms. 

  • This session provides an introduction to effective tools and techniques for planning, creating and maintaining spreadsheets. It shows you how to find and solve existing errors as well as introducing procedures that prevent new errors arising. The session also explains how to evaluate and “tame” a spreadsheet that you inherit so that you can deploy it effectively.

  • You can add a field to your table, in an Access database, which notes the date when the record was last edited.

  • Learn the value of lookups and master some Lookup functions to use on your spreadsheets.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Good practice with lookups".

  • ATLAS.ti is a workbench for the qualitative analysis of large bodies of textual, graphical, audio and video data. It offers a variety of features and advanced analysis tools for analysing, coding, and visualising a wide range of qualitative data (e.g., text, image, video, audio, geo-data, and Twitter data).

  • This session shows you how to use Excel’s lookup functions to retrieve only the results that you need from spreadsheet tables of any size.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • This session shows how to include graphs effectively in a report or a research paper, providing guidance on which charts to use and how to use them to convey messages clearly and effectively.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Grow your confidence in devising and checking formulae in a spreadsheet.

    This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Turning problems into simple formulae".

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    A hands-on activity session to grow your confidence in devising and checking formulae in a spreadsheet.

    For full details about this course, visit the course booking system.

     

  • Read about different ways to manage a many-to-many relationship in your data

  • This task will give you a flavour of how the huge library of online video-based courses at LinkedIn Learning can help you in your work.

    You can try this task on your own, although it was designed to be done in a classroom with a teacher to support you.

  • Download a filter to help you import BibTeX files into EndNote and a style for outputting EndNote references in BibTeX format (suitable for ORCID uploading).

  • Citation indexes allow you to find items which have cited a particular work or author by analysing the bibliographies of books and articles. This can help you to discover new items in the same research area or to track how thinking has developed on a particular topic.

  • This video activity will help you prepare for the workshop "Spreadsheets: Start to finish".

  • Inkpath is a personal skills tracking app.

    Did you know that, as an Oxford researcher, you get a FREE licence to use Inkpath, and can take it with you when you leave? With Inkpath you can:

    •     Discover activities, resources and guidance from across Oxford, relevant to you

    •     Adopt goals and pathways curated by Oxford’s Divisions